Welcome!

Jennifer Douglas is a literary publicist who believes in the right of equality for all authors. With a vision of a world where positivity is the norm and negativity is long forgotten Jennifer works alongside authors creating a marketing and publicity plan that meets the needs of the individual.

With years of experience in publicity, public relations and the marketing industry, which includes working with Allen and Unwin and Palmer Higgs Publishing, Jennifer has become a well sort after reviewer. To work with Jennifer is to know you are working with someone who will not hold back on being open and honest about your book and its marketing possibilities.

Having undertaken many courses in writing and poetry over the years Jennifer has a vast knowledge in the field of writing and reviewing, being able to provide an efficient, effective and professional service. As a qualified Early Childhood Educator and a home educating mum with over 16 years experience, she has a passion for quality children's books and educational resources.

Having spent 6 years as the founder and managing editor of two magazines, Good Gabble and Rattling Reviews, Jennifer has an eye for marketing and sales, knowing what the consumer is looking for and how to reach them. She works individually with each client meeting their needs and the needs of their product. She has many years experience in critiquing websites, placing herself in the shoes of the consumer who is browsing. Many clients return time and time again knowing they will be receiving an honest, open and non judgmental review or critique. Jennifer prides herself on providing a friendly, non threatening and personal service. Her clients are able to contact her personally throughout the whole review process.


For further information on the services Jennifer offers please visit her website www.jenniferdouglasliterarypublicist.com. This blog is a review base only.




Monday, December 9, 2013

Jimbo! Don't Go! by Teena Raffa-Mulligan







Jimbo! Don’t go! by Teena Raffa-Mulligan is a rhythmically written rhyme book that touches on the topic of stranger danger. 

One rainy day Jumbo Jim is on his way home from school alone when a tiger stops and offers him a lift. Time promises to get him home and dry quicker than a snake can blink an eye - but Jimbo says no. Mum has told him never to go with strangers. That’s when Tiger Tim says he is a family friend - and he has chocolate too.

Will Jimbo remember his mother’s stranger danger warning - or go with Tim?

Teena Raffa-Mulligan has a great story line and concept that should be discussed with all children. Stranger Danger is a topic that at one point in time should be addressed with children. It is a topic for the safety of our children.

I am a little uncertain of this book. As parents we all have differing points of view on how to bring up our children and what to teach them in different situations. I have to honestly say that Jimbo! Don’t Go! did not sit with my values of what I would teach my children. I found both the story and the illustrations to portray images that did not sit comfortably with myself. I actually found myself questioning if the aim of this book was to open discussion with our children on what not to do. 

So what upset me?

For me personally I found the violent way mother elephant dealt with Tiger, swinging him around by the tail and dealing with him herself until the police arrive as uncalled for, not only placing herself in danger but that of her child. Yes we would want to attack any predator that put our children at risk but this is not socially acceptable and we surely do not want to be encourage our children to lash out and call the police later.  Whilst this is happening in words the picture portrays Jimbo standing by laughing at what his mum is doing. 

‘Now she’d dealt with Tiger Tim it was time to deal with Jim. She ignored his woeful wail and tied a knot into his tail”

What! Is this the way we deal with our children by abusing them when they are in an upsetting situation. I surely would never deal with my children in this manner.  Would this not have been the opportunity to talk to Jimbo about the situation in a loving calm way opening the discussion of what to do when a stranger approaches you. I want my children to be able to confidently come to me when in danger knowing they can openly communicate with me without the risk of me yelling at them. 

What it is important to remember here is that books are a personal thing. Jimbo! Don’t Go! is not a book that sat well with me but this does not mean it is not a book that will sit with the morals and values of others. I loved the topical issue of this book and support a need for the teaching of stranger danger to our children but feel this can be done without instilling the need for violence in our children.

When seeking other reviews on this book I was only able to find one online which basically gave an overview of the book and no real opinion on how they found it. Maybe how I see this book is completely wrong. I would love to hear the opinion of others, after all book reviews are about opening discussion on the differing opinions of readers. 

Watch a reading of Jimbo! Don’t Go! on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ej6k42tsdo